Friday, October 30, 2009

CloudBuddy has Support for viewing Jungle Disk files

Here I am at CSS Labs, developing components for our very own CloudBuddy… Wonder what CloudBuddy is? Take a look at www.mycloudbuddy.com and I promise, you would want to have a go at it.

And what exactly am I going to write here? After thinking for quite some time, I decided that I could tell you about what CloudBuddy can do with Jungle Disk files…

Here we go… This one is interesting… Jungle Disk Support

I was going through the users’ feedback on CloudBuddy… One Jungle Disk user had this problem of not being able to view the files that he had uploaded (using Jungle Disk) into S3 using other tools and he had raised an issue on whether this can be handled in CloudBuddy.

And I thought – Why not??

Jungle Disk website briefed me about what Jungle disk is all about, with their encrypted storage mechanism and stuff… And there I found that Jungle Disk gives us his decryption API… A very good gesture indeed…

So, I decided to have a look at the Jungle Disk Decryption API. C# Code, of course… I was just going through the code and believe me, it was Greek and Latin for me the first time I looked into it…

Of course, going through the code written by someone else is always a tough task… I was searching for answers on how I’m going to make it… And the solution was right in front of me… Jungle disk had given a sample application that uses his API!

And that was all that I needed… And the way CloudBuddy was programmed, it made my life all the more simpler… All I had to do is just build a file structure that both the Jungle Disk API and CloudBuddy can understand… Done!! That’s it… CloudBuddy has built-in support for viewing and downloading Jungle Disk files… :-) who else has??

Jungle Disk users, if you wish to try out CloudBuddy to view or download your Jungle Disk files, read on for the instructions…

JUNGLE DISK:

Jungle Disk creates only one bucket per location (US / EUROPE) per user. Hence the user can have utmost 2 buckets.

The 2 buckets are named by (possibly) prefixing “jd2-” and suffixing “-us” (or “-eu”) to the MD5 hash value of the access key provided by Amazon to the particular user.

For example, the 2 possible buckets for a user will look like this :

▪ jd2 - MD5 Hash value of your AWS Access Key - us
▪ jd2 - MD5 Hash value of your AWS Access Key - eu

jd2 – Jungle Disk Version 2
us – Location United States
eu – Location Europe


Jungle Disk considers either or both of the above buckets as Top-Level Buckets and allows us to create infinite number of Sub-Buckets (or Folders, to be more precise) under the Top-Level Buckets.

One important feature about Jungle Disk is that it provides the option of encryption of sub-buckets (folders) and files.

It gives us the option of whether or not a Sub-Bucket (Folder) must be password protected.

Jungle Disk creates a different architecture on how the Sub-Bucket's contents are organized based on whether the Sub-Bucket is password protected or not. And that's where CloudBuddy can make a difference

Here’s what CloudBuddy can do with your Jungle Disk files / folders…

Cool… Isn’t it?... Try CloudBuddy… You'll love it:-)

1 comment:

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